Hpapun Situation Update: Dwe Lo Township, May to August 2016

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Hpapun Situation Update: Dwe Lo Township, May to August 2016

Published date:
Wednesday, January 11, 2017

This Situation Update describes events occurring in Dwe Lo Township, Hpapun District during the period between May and August 2016, including livelihood issues, gold mining, health and education.

  • In May 2016, more than half of the civilians in Dwe Lo Township had to stop working on their hill farms because all of their paddy plants were destroyed by mice.
  • Between 2015 and 2016, Chinese wealthy individuals conducted gold mining in Bu Law Klo River, Dwe Lo Township, Hpapun District. This impacted civilians’ livelihoods because it destroyed their river-side farm lands and civilians could no longer easily travel and use the river for their livelihood.
  • Between May and August 2016, diarrhoea, headaches, leg or arm pains, and flu were common illnesses faced villagers in Bu Tho Township, Hpapun District. They usually accessed medical treatment through nurses or medics in the village, but without money they could not access medical treatment.
  • In 2016, Dwe Lo Township Karen Education Department [KED] chairman Saw Bwah reported that, “students in Dwe Lo Township still have to pay the student fee for the teachers’ salary but we will try for the students [to get]  free education in the coming year”. 

Footnotes

[1] KHRG trains community members in southeast Burma/Myanmar to document individual human rights abuses using a standardised reporting format; conduct interviews with other villagers; and write general updates on the situation in areas with which they are familiar.  When writing situation updates, community members are encouraged to summarise recent events, raise issues that they consider to be important, and present their opinions or perspective on abuse and other local dynamics in their area.

[2] Pah Tee or Dtee is a familiar S’gaw Karen term of respect attributed to an older man that translates to “uncle,” but it does not necessarily signify any actual familial relationship.

[3] U is a Burmese title used for elder men, used before their name.

[4]Mu ghar is a familiar S’gaw Karen term of respect attributed to an older woman that translates to “aunt,” but it does not necessarily signify any actual familial relationship.

[5] All conversion estimates for the Baht in this report are based on the January 10th 2017_official market rate of 35.54 Baht to US $1.