Development project

Development project

This issue includes natural resource extraction and development projects in eastern Burma. Types of projects documented include: mining; logging; commercial plantation agriculture; commercial fishery farming; hydropower, electricity and dam-building; road construction; and military camp and infrastructure development. Villagers describe similar patterns of abuse across all of these projects, perpetrated or facilitated by government military and civilian officials, international corporate actors, and ethnic armed groups. Natural resource extraction and development initiatives are typically planned and initiated unilaterally, without input from local communities. This means that local villagers are often not consulted about what their communities need for development; not given the opportunity to voice concerns about how projects will affect their land and livelihoods; and not given a chance to negotiate standards for project implementation, or for what they feel is ‘fair’ compensation for anticipated losses of property or impacts on livelihoods. During the implementation of projects, rural communities continue to be excluded from engagement and negotiation with relevant authorities, or denied the opportunity to invoke formal legal remedies. This lack of local engagement is a particular concern for projects affecting rural, and particularly ethnic, communities who face greater obstacles to political organisation and expression than their counterparts in more central areas of Burma. People living in rural areas of eastern Burma depend on access to land for agrarian livelihoods activities, hill and flat-field paddy farming, animal husbandry, and small-scale cash-crop plantations. The loss or destruction of land during these projects devastates communities’ ability support themselves. Increased militarization in areas around project sites also increases extractive abuses in the surrounding area, such as forced labour, taxation and land confiscation, further burdening already strained livelihoods.

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E.g., 2017-07-28
E.g., 2017-07-28

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E.g., 2017-07-28
E.g., 2017-07-28

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