Toungoo Situation Update: Thandaunggyi Township, November 2016 to March 2017

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Toungoo Situation Update: Thandaunggyi Township, November 2016 to March 2017

Published date:
Wednesday, November 15, 2017

This Situation Update describes events occurring in Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District during the period between November 2016 to March 2017, including Tatmadaw activity, education, healthcare and livelihoods.

  • Villagers were concerned for their security when Bu Yin Naung military section conducted the 48th annual Company Commander training between November 8th and 11th, 2016 on confiscated land in Kyon Kone, Nan Thar Kone and Ywar Thit villages.
  • From November 8th 2016 to March 13th 2017, the Tatmadaw actively conducted numerous military activities, including military training, troop rotations, sending rations and ammunition, upgrading military camps, and patrolling around frontline areas in Thandaunggyi Township.
  • The educational situation in Thandaunggyi Township, and particularly in the western part of Day Lo area and the P’Leh Hoo Geh area, remains poor as many are unable to access education and the overall quality of education is poor.
  • The health situation in Thandaunggyi Township, and particularly in Ta Poo area and in the western part of Klay Wa area remains poor as local villagers have difficulty accessing healthcare due to insufficient medicine supplies and health workers.

 

Footnotes

[1] KHRG trains community members in southeast Burma/Myanmar to document individual human rights abuses using a standardised reporting format; conduct interviews with other villagers; and write general updates on the situation in areas with which they are familiar.  When writing situation updates, community members are encouraged to summarise recent events, raise issues that they consider to be important, and present their opinions or perspective on abuse and other local dynamics in their area.

[2] In order to increase the transparency of KHRG methodology and more directly communicate the experiences and perspectives of villagers in southeastern Burma/Myanmar, KHRG aims to make all field information received available on the KHRG website once it has been processed and translated, subject only to security considerations. For additional reports categorised by Type, Issue, Location and Year, please see the Related Readings component following each report on KHRG’s website.

[3] Military Operations Command (MOC) is comprised of ten battalions for offensive operations. Most MOCs have three Tactical Operations Commands (TOCs) made up of three battalions each.

[4] An Infantry Battalion (Tatmadaw) comprises 500 soldiers. However, most Infantry Battalions in the Tatmadaw are under-strength with less than 200 soldiers. They are primarily used for garrison duty but are sometimes used in offensive operations.

[5] A Tatmadaw Light Infantry Battalion (LIB) comprises 500 soldiers. However, most Light Infantry Battalions in the Tatmadaw are under-strength with less than 200 soldiers. LIBs are primarily used for offensive operations, but they are sometimes used for garrison duties.

[6] As per the 2012 preliminary ceasefire agreement between the KNU and the Burma/Myanmar government, the Tatmadaw are only allowed to operate and travel up to 50 yards from either side of roads that connect their army camps through KNLA territory, and only within a 150 yard radius around their own army camp.