Toungoo Situation Update: Thandaunggyi Township, November 2016 to January 2017

Pages

You are here

Toungoo Situation Update: Thandaunggyi Township, November 2016 to January 2017

Published date:
Tuesday, September 19, 2017

This Situation Update describes events occurring in Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District between November 2016 and January 2017, including updates on education, healthcare, military activity and development transactions.

  • High school students’ mock-examination pass rate was low in Thandaung Myo Thit High School, Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District, and teachers were called to a meeting and urged to teach extra classes in order for the students to pass their final exams.
  • On November 7, 2016, an A--- villager named Saw B---, 39 years old, was injured in a blast caused by accidently hitting old artillery in his cardamom plantation in Maung Nwe Gyi village tract, Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District.
  • Between November and December, 2016, Tatmadaw sent out rations and ammunition to their frontline military camps in Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District by military trucks with numerous horses inside. The convoy started from Toungoo Town and went to Baw G’ Lee. This panicked local villagers since the action represented particular military movement that they perceived to jeopardise the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement.  
  • Road construction and the construction of a telecommunication tower have been conducted in Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District without villagers’ consultation or agreement. Villagers were unsatisfied about the development actors’ response regarding compensation for the loss and damage of their lands and plantations. 

Footnotes

[1] KHRG trains community members in southeast Burma/Myanmar to document individual human rights abuses using a standardised reporting format; conduct interviews with other villagers; and write general updates on the situation in areas with which they are familiar.  When writing situation updates, community members are encouraged to summarise recent events, raise issues that they consider to be important, and present their opinions or perspective on abuse and other local dynamics in their area.

[2] A standard refers to a school year in the education system of Burma/Myanmar. The basic education system has a 5-4-2 structure. Primary school runs from Standard 1 to Standard 5, lower secondary school is Standard 6 to Standard 9, and upper secondary school is Standard 10 to Standard 11.

[3] The Union Solidarity and Development Party (Pyi Khaing Pyo in Burmese, Pa Ka Hpa in Karen) is the successor of the Union Solidarity and Development Association. It was officially registered as a political party on June 2nd 2010 and was headed by Myanmar President Thein Sein. In November 2015, the National League for Democracy (NLD) ousted the USDP in a landslide election, winning a majority of seats in parliament.

[4] On January 12th 2012, a preliminary ceasefire agreement was signed between the KNU and Burma/Myanmar government in Hpa-an. Negotiations for a longer-term peace plan are still under way. For updates on the peace process, see the KNU Stakeholder webpage on the Myanmar Peace Monitor website. For KHRG's analysis of changes in human rights conditions since the ceasefire, see Truce or Transition? Trends in human rights abuse and local response since the 2012 ceasefire, KHRG, May 2014. In March 2015, the seventh round of the negotiations for a national ceasefire between the Burma/Myanmar government and various ethnic armed actors began in Yangon, see “Seventh Round of Nationwide Ceasefire Negotiations,” Karen National Union Headquarters, March 18th 2015. Following the negotiations, the KNU held a central standing committee emergency, see “KNU: Emergency Meeting Called To Discuss Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement And Ethnic Leaders’ Summit,” Karen News, April 22nd 2015.

[5] The reason that an NLD member came to discuss Saw B---’s condition with doctors is unclear.

[6] On October 15th 2015, after a negotiation process marred with controversy over the notable non-inclusion of several ethnic armed groups and on-going conflicts in ethnic regions, a Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA) was signed between the Burma/Myanmar government and eight of the fifteen ethnic armed groups originally invited to the negotiation table, including the KNU, see “Myanmar signs ceasefire with eight armed groups,” Reuters, October 15th 2015. Despite the signing of the NCA prompting a positive response from the international community, see “Myanmar: UN chief welcomes ‘milestone’ signing of ceasefire agreement,” UN News Centre, October 15th 2015, KNU Chairman General Saw Mutu Say Poe’s decision to sign has been met with strong opposition from other members of the Karen armed resistance and civil society groups alike, who believe the decision to be undemocratic and the NCA itself to be a superficial agreement that risks undermining a genuine peace process, see “Without Real Political Roadmap, Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement Leads Nowhere...,” Karen News, September 1st 2015. The signing of the NCA followed the January 12th 2012 preliminary ceasefire agreement between the KNU and Burma/Myanmar government in Hpa-an. For KHRG's analysis of changes in human rights conditions since the preliminary ceasefire, see Truce or Transition? Trends in human rights abuse and local response since the 2012 ceasefire, KHRG, May 2014.

[7] Fighting between Myanmar army and KIA (Kachin Independence Army) was restarted in 2011 after the 17-year-long ceasefire broke down. See “Scores Displaced Following Fighting in Kachin State’s Mansi Township,” The Irrawaddy, September 21st 2015.

[8] Burmese prefix meaning ‘officer’