Collision between Tatmadaw military truck and a villager’s motorbike in Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District, May 2016

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Collision between Tatmadaw military truck and a villager’s motorbike in Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District, May 2016

Published date:
Wednesday, September 14, 2016

This News Bulletin describes a collision between a Tatmadaw military truck and a villager’s motorbike in Thandaunggyi Township, Toungoo District on May 3rd 2016. The two villagers who were riding the motorbike died in the incident. The Tatmadaw continued driving after the collision without taking care of the villagers. The local villagers thought the Tatmadaw Light Infantry Battalion (LIB) #124 was responsible for this incident so they reported it to the police who then went with the villagers to the #930 Supply Unit to investigate the case. The military truck driver Ko Ye who was involved in the incident had already fled when the police found out about the case. At the time of writing, the police are continuing their investigation and the perpetrator has yet to be located.[1]

Footnotes

[1] This News Bulletin was written by KHRG office staff and is based on information from a community member from Toungoo District who has been trained by KHRG to monitor local human rights conditions. It summarises information from three incident reports, one situation update and one interview received by KHRG in May 2016. In order to increase the transparency of KHRG methodology and more directly communicate the experiences and perspectives of villagers in southeast Burma/Myanmar, KHRG aims to make all field information received available on the KHRG website once it has been processed and translated, subject only to security considerations. For additional reports categorised by Type, Issue, Location and Year, please see the Related Readings component following each report on KHRG’s website.

[2] Light Infantry Battalion (Tatmadaw) comprises 500 soldiers. However, most Light Infantry Battalions in the Tatmadaw are under-strength with less than 200 soldiers. Primarily for offensive operations but sometimes used for garrison duties.

[3] Saw is a S’gaw Karen male honorific title used before a person’s name.

[4] Naw is a S’gaw Karen female honorific title used before a person’s name.

[5] This information was included in an interview received by KHRG in May 2016 from a KHRG community member from Toungoo District.